Cheering for School

Regardless of where you land on the American school system, governmental standards, or the best way to teach kids, when it all comes down to it I just want my son to learn and develop into a healthy, fulfilled, and outward focused person. This is our hope and prayer for him.

With driving on the road, living arrangements, his own anxieties, and occasional other issues, we have bounced from school to school since he began. This isn’t necessarily conducive to his learning or fulfillment, etc.

After lots of prayer, and feeling God impossibly open doors that we were not planning to even explore, we now find ourselves in a position to be intentional about his school choice. We began sixth grade this week at The King’s Academy in Jonesboro, Indiana. This morning I dropped he and his friend off at a local church camp for the vision retreat King’s does every fall. As we drove in the driveway was lined with older students clapping and cheering for these younger students arriving. I dropped these two off at the front door where there were even more older students clapping and cheering as they walked through. I wish I could capture the joy on their faces or bottle up the excitement pouring off of my son or at least forever remember the biggest smile I’ve seen on his face in a long time. It was like a gauntlet of welcome and cheer, and my eyes wouldn’t quit leaking as I was suddenly overcome with emotion! My son has never been this excited for anything school related (except for the end of the day).

There are a number of reasons that Heather and I have been confirmed in discerning God’s will for getting off the road delivering campers and entering ministry at Hanfield United Methodist in Marion. Seeing his face this morning and hearing him say this will be the best day of school ever, is the best reason yet.

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Unity

The Church loves talking about the Prodigal Son – the redemption, forgiveness, and celebration are irresistible. How often do we examine the older brother and repent of our contributions of dis-unity in themodern Church? This message is a call to Unity.

Preached on 7/2/17 at Hanfield UMC.

Towards A Theology of Play

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Towards a Theology of Play

There is plenty of research and writing about the need for enjoying one’s Sabbath time. After a summer of driving my students hard towards a better understanding of God (believing that what we think about God determines how we act and live our lives) by exploring His attributes I wanted to give them a Sunday “off” at youth group. The purpose was less to explain the need for a Sabbath and have one (though we did) than to simply hope to redeem time off for these students. I’m a parent – I wish my son wouldn’t like to almost exclusively play (to my chagrin I realize my cultural conditioning in that statement). On the other hand, our culture makes much of work and commitments while making fun of those who seem to spend their time playfully. The generation coming up is perhaps more stressed than at any other time in history!

Despite this, I’m gaining a bit of a bookish reputation with my new youth group. Since I got here in April we’ve played a few games, but I find this to be a far less important aspect of youth group than helping teach our students a more vibrant faith (Vibrant faith is contagious, disciple-making faith). I’m having fun, I make our youth meetings fun even while we’re doing lessons, and I’m hearing from most all of these students that it is a direction they’re quite pleased with. Let’s be real though, many students come to youth group simply for a breather from “life” and to have some fun in the midst of their busy lives, especially now that school has started.

This past Sunday we had a game night. There was junk food galore, board games spread around, foosball upstairs, some football tossing outside, and an impromptu dodgeball game targeting those of us gathered at the different game tables. We had a blast. With about fifteen minutes left, though, I pulled them aside for a “Gotcha!”

Promised Play

Rather than playing (ha!) into cultural stereotypes glorifying work to the demonization of play, I wanted to help redeem the idea of play for our students and give them an ordained view of playtime (in community).

Psalm 104 celebrates the glory of God’s creation and the diversity of His creativity. Specifically, vv 24-26 speaks of something (Leviathan) created for play! Indeed, you can’t look at some of the creatures in our world and not see a playful Creator God!

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Duck Hunting

Duck Hunting, A leadership principle by Keith Drury.

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Re-discovered this piece from a professor of mine. I sure remember my singular form of duck hunting experience, and it was a huge bummer when I missed any. Perhaps that favorite game of yesteryear was a bit of a mis-leading experience when discussing “duck hunting” as a leadership principle.

So often a leader, or anybody with some form of influence, gets their ego hung up on what they’re missing out on. Especially in Christian leadership even one soul won for Christ is a victory, but so many pastors are more concerned with the numbers they missed that day than what they had. Sad but true.

I find this to be true of myself. My ego often got the better of me and let Satan trip me up with thoughts of inferiority when my other thoughts told me I was destined for greatness. I can tell you stories of Duck Hunting gone wrong, and I can back those stories up with personal data of what happens when a leader doesn’t keep their ego in check. Needless to say, I’m glad that I’m much appreciative for what I have these days.

What do you think? Do you focus on the ducks you hit or the ones you missed? Or would you rather talk about the NES game? You can comment here, but I’m sure Coach would be thrilled if you commented directly to him: http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#!/profile.php?id=161502633

Thanks!! Go with GOD.